Monthly Archives: July 2015

Red Fronted Lemur

Name: Red Fronted Lemur
Common Name: Red Fronted Lemur
Latin Name: Eulemur fulvus rufus
About: 3 Red Fronted Lemurs were donated to us by a private keeper, as although they have the highest level of protection under CITES the keeper had no certificates, so could not sell them, display them or use them for any commercial purpose.

Once we were notified of his wish to anonymously donate them we contacted the CITES licensing branch in Bristol to explain the situation and request that they issue us with permits which would allow the use of the animals only for an educational or conservation purpose. This they agreed to grant after imposing strict conditions that we agreed to meet.

3 weeks later we collected the Lemurs and moved them to the Animal Reception Centre at Heathrow, where they had a quick check over. The intention was that the 3 of them would go to a pre-arranged college where they would join the animal care training centre under the care of the experienced animal manager employed there. However once they were collected it turned out that over the previous couple of weeks the male and one of the females had paired off and were bullying the other female who have needed to be separated off.

It was then decided on welfare grounds that the pair should go on to the college and the single female would stay with us while we located a mate for her.

Bill & Ben

Name: Bill & Ben
Common Name: Common Marmosets
Latin Name: Callithrix jacchus
About: Bill & Ben were donated to us by a TV production company after they were purchased by them in order to remove them from the terrible conditions they were being kept under.

They were both housed in a filthy bird cage measuring 45cm long x 30cm wide x 30cm high, with no nest box, which they had been living in for 3 months.

When they first arrived with us they were so nervous that Bill would not leave the old cage for over an hour and had to be tempted with waxworms before he built up the courage to move.

For the next week we kept them together in a cage measuring 50cm wide x 100cm long x 120cm high while they got used to the extra space and a nest box.

They quickly grew more confident and we moved them out side to a 240cm long x 160cm wide by 200cm aviary which was divided into an indoor heated house and a covered outside area. We hung a selection of toys and ropes in both areas and they settled beautifully.

Their final move is to a college where they have an enclosure with indoor and outdoor areas totalling about 20 cubic metres. It is hoped that in the future we will introduce a number of other common marmosets to the group in the hope of producing a more natural family group.

African Pygmy Hedgehog

Name: African Pygmy Hedgehog
Common Name: African Pygmy Hedgehog
Latin Name: Erinaceus albiventris
About: In 2001 we received 3 African Pygmy Hedgehog’s which had been seized by DEFRA on welfare grounds, while transiting through Heathrow.

Once they had served their quarantine period at the Animal Reception Centre at Heathrow they were placed on loan in a zoo’s education centre.

Barn Owls

Name: Barn Owls
Common Name: Barn Owls
Latin Name: Tyto Alba
About: We recently took in 4 Captive Bred Barn Owls, after the owners circumstances changed and she contacted uk for help.

We don’t normally accept owls for re-homing, however on this occasion we had 2 zoos who had recently opened a British species display and were looking to offer a permanent home to either injured specimens or captive bred animals.

Each collection took 2 Barn Owls and we are happy to say that they have settled well in their new homes.

If you have Captive Bred Owls that require Re-homing please go to our links section where you will find a couple of organisations who should be able to help you.

Tawny Owls

Name: Tawny Owls
Common Name: Tawny Owls
Latin Name: Strix aluco
About: We recently took in 2 Captive Bred Tawny Owls, after the owners circumstances changed and she contacted uk for help.

We don’t normally accept owls for re-homing, however on this occasion we had a zoo who had recently opened a British species display and were looking to offer a permanent home to either injured specimens or captive bred animals

the collection took both the Tawny Owls and we are happy to say that they have settled well in their new home.

If you have Captive Bred Owls that require Re-homing please go to our links section where you will find a couple of organisations who should be able to help you.

Prescott

Name: Prescott
Common Name: Common Snapping Turtle
Latin Name: Chelydra serpentina
About: A turtle with a vicious bite and a temper to match was christened ‘Prescott’ by staff at Great Yarmouth Sea Life Centre…after the fiery former deputy PM.

His star may be fading in the political arena, but the testy member for Hull was the first person who came to mind when Sea Life’s Claire Little took delivery of a large snapping turtle…found abandoned in a boating lake during july 2007.

“He’s an American snapping turtle, about 18 inches long and we think about 12 years old,” said Claire.

“He was found by someone cleaning debris from a boating lake at a Norfolk zoo, where we think he’d been surreptitiously dumped by his former owner.”

After a health check and short stay over winter in the heated conditions at the Sealife Centre in Scarborough, Prescott has come to us so that we can find a suitable permanent home for her (yes Prescott is a female!)

Snapping Turtle

Name: Snapping Turtle
Common Name: Snapping Turtle
Latin Name: Chelydra serpentina
About: Our latest snapping turtle arrived with us in march 2007, as he had out grown his tank.

He has a shell length of approximately 22cm and weighed in at just under 3kg.

He is currently waiting to move into his new home which has been offered to him by a public aquarium, where he will be displayed to explain to the public how large this species grows, how aggressive they can be and why they do not make suitable pets!

Tango

Name: Tango
Common Name: Burmese Python
Latin Name: Python molurus
About: Tango Came to us after his owners divorced and he could no longer be housed correctly.

He is about 14ft and 15 years old.

He has found a new home at a zoo where he meets the public a few times a week during the reptile education session.

Indonesian Snake Necked Turtle

Name: Indonesian Snake Necked Turtle
Common Name: Indonesian Snake Necked Turtle
Latin Name: Macrochelodina rugosa (Formerly Chelodina siebenrocki)
About: In the wild this species occurs along the southern coast of West Papua New Guinea and Papua New Guinea living in steams, marshes and swamps.

The largest specimen that we have ever had handed in had a shell size of 35cm with a neck length of 28cm!

Norman

Name: Norman
Common Name: African crested porcupine
Latin Name: Hystrix cristata
About: Norman is a young African crested porcupine, we are unsure of ‘his’ sex at the moment, so he may turn out to be Norma!

He was captured in a ‘live fox trap’ by the RSPCA after appearing in a garden in Oxfordshire. He was seen by the house owner eating food which had been placed outside to feed other, more normal British wildlife.

He returned the following day and the home owner managed to get some photos to convince the RSPCA that he had not been drinking, there actually was a porcupine in his garden, and no it was not just a big hedgehog!

With the photo evidence the RSPCA sent one of their staff members down on a Saturday evening at dusk to set a live trap, baited with apples and other fruit.

Amazingly she received a call at 1am on the Sunday morning to tell her that it had been captured!

Later that Sunday morning she called us to say that Norman had been trapped and could we please arrange to collect him as they felt he required specialised care and they would prefer it if we could take control of Norman and arrange a good home for him, assuming no one came forward to claim him.

African crested Porcupines are given the highest status under Annex A of the European endangered species act and the European Protected Species legislation, which makes it an offence to possess or handle species covered without a licence. Luckily Specialist Wildlife Services is fully licensed by Natural England who were immediately informed of Normans capture.

Norman is currently resting and recovering from his ordeal at the animal reception centre at Heathrow and once he has been checked over by the vet, he will be placed out on loan so that he can socialise and join other Porcupines!